Consolidated Credit Recommends: SocialSecurityforVeterans.com

Attention vets, could you use an extra $100,000? This Veteran’s Day discover how you can increase your lifetime retirement benefits for free.

(Fort Lauderdale, FL) – Our veterans and their widows and widowers deserve every benefit possible, especially after serving our country so bravely. And this Veteran’s Day they will receive one.

Veterans, including active duty military, will be able to access a free report that will help them understand how to make the most of retirement income from Social Security on November 11, 2013 at www.SocialSecurityforVeterans.com. To get started sooner, go to www.ssa.gov/mystatement to create a my Social Security account.

At Consolidated Credit, we applaud this free tool that’s designed to help veterans get ahead…

Our veteran’s should receive free tools – especially one that helps them estimate the worth of their benefits. A recent survey revealed more than seven in ten veterans weren’t really sure how much monthly benefits are cut if they requested benefits at age 62 instead of 66 the official retirement age. That’s sad and should be remedied.

We understand the value of every penny considering we’ve been helping people recover from debt for over 20 years. And receiving the utmost money from social security is paramount for most people in the United States. Statistics prove it:

  • Nine out of 10 Americans age 65 and older receive benefits
  • Payments add up to just shy of 40% of their total retirement income
  • Half of all couples and three-fourths of unmarried beneficiaries receive more than half of their retirement income from Social Security
  • In the near future 10,000 baby boomers a day will file to claim Social Security benefits.

Make the most of your retirement income. All people preparing to collect social security benefits, including those who’ve served in the military, should be aware of the rules and guidelines that determine how much money will be paid out each month. Starting your benefits early will be costly – a person who claims their benefits early, at age 62 (the earliest age possible) will collect $1,125, compared to $1,980 for someone who claims them later in life at age 70. Waiting pays off.