Depressing News with a Happy Ending

Just because you aren’t getting fulfillment out of your current job doesn’t mean that there aren’t better things to come.

You probably won’t be shocked to learn most Americans hate their jobs. But you might be shocked to learn this: Most of them did like their jobs just last year.

From 2012 to 2013, the level of job satisfaction plummeted from 59.2 percent to 38.5 percent. That’s according to a recent survey by Salary.com, which also revealed…

  • 52.3 percent of employees are fully committed to their work – down from last year’s 71.4 percent
  • 29.5 percent would continue to work even if they won the lottery compared to last year’s 41.5 percent
  • 19.5 percent work extra hours because they enjoy the work – compared to last year’s 48.5 percent
  • 72 percent of workers primarily work for a paycheck – as opposed to last year’s 55 percent

So what happened in one year to depress so many employees?

“The psychological toll of the great recession may have caused people to feel burnt out; where in a down economy employees tended to put their head down, accept lower pay with more responsibility and were often underemployed or even unemployed,” says Abby Euler, general manager at Salary.com.

This survey is telling us what most already know. Workers are asking themselves what their career adds to their overall life. And the answer that most of us keep coming up with is that it adds nothing.

However there is room for change. Unhappy workers don’t have to settle for mediocrity. But you want to keep in mind that in any dream employment situation there will be both peaks and valleys. You may love your dream job but hate your boss. Don’t get caught up in the dream, because the reality may be much different.

Before you begin actively looking for an alternate career path make sure that you have budgeted for possible emergencies and employments gaps. If you need help creating budget, visit Consolidated Credit’s section on budgeting.