Self-Employed Jobs Plummet since Recession

But there is hope for some self-employed workers and a surprising new trend.

Back in 2006, more than 7 percent of all the jobs in the United States had no boss – because they were self-employed job. But since then, the number of Americans working for has dropped to 6.6 percent – a loss of 936,000 jobs since the beginning of the recession.

That’s according to a new report by jobs website CareerBuilder. Self-employed workers in agriculture, child care, real estate and retail have suffered the biggest declines. But there’s hope for low-paying jobs such as construction laborers, landscaping workers, maids, personal care aides and photographers.

If those jobs don’t interest you, then don’t quit your day job – as a matter of fact, keep your job and take on a second job. That seems to be the surprising trend. The CareerBuilder report reveal 20 percent of full-time workers picked up a second job in 2013 or plan to do so in 2014.

If the thought of taking a second job makes your head spin or you need more income to support a plan for self employement, then focus on getting ahead at the job you have. Here are some tips that can help you advance:

  • Focus on your work and go the extra mile so you can go to your boss and negotiate for a raise.
  • And don’t be afraid to negotiate — especially if you haven’t had a pay increase because your company stopped advancement after the recession
  • Learn new skills so you can qualify for a promotion
  • If you are an hourly employee, check into options for working overtime or taking on extra shifts.

Advancing can be easier said than done, but you have to be hungry and you have to be willing to outperform the next person.

If you’re still interested in becoming self-employed, check out this chart of the top self-employed occupations that have gained the most jobs from 2006 to 2013.

Description

Change

% Change

Managers, All Other

39,839

15%

Landscaping & Groundskeeping Workers

37,939

13%

Maids & Housekeeping Cleaners

37,102

9%

Construction Laborers

30,287

10%

Personal Care Aides

17,367

18%

Web Developers

10,819

67%

Recreation Workers

9,116

40%

Medical Transcriptionists

8,902

375%

Home Health Aides

8,151

22%

Photographers

7,968

12%

If your job isn’t bringing in enough to pay what you have going out, consult a certified credit counselor today for a free debt analysis.