The Best New Year’s Resolution

Can you really keep this ambitious resolution? Yes, if you do it this way.

While the calendar changes this time each year, the two most popular New Year’s resolutions never do: Lose weight and save money.

 

For 2016, pollsters have already found that 44 percent of Americans will resolve to be healthier and/or lose weight. In a distant second place is “financial stability” at 29 percent. From there, it’s a big drop to resolutions about getting a better job (13 percent) and getting a better education (9 percent).

Past polls have shown that only 8 percent of us actually keep our New Year’s resolutions. So most advice about making resolutions suggests you keep them modest – which makes them easier to achieve.

Consolidated Credit president Gary Herman has a different idea: Make one big resolution about both health and finances, then achieve it before Valentine’s Day.

“I’ve been counseling Americans about debt for more than two decades, and I’ve seen how health and money are tightly woven together,” Herman says. “Stress is a constant drain on our health, and nothing is more stressful than debt.”

Getting out of debt is difficult right after the holiday season – 23 percent of us will need 3-6 months to pay off all the gifts we bought, while 8 percent will need even longer.

But what if you could reduce your credit card payments by 30 to 50 percent? Reduce interest rates? Stop late fees?

“That would effectively double your chances of achieving your financial resolution,” Herman says, “and with that stress gone, you’ll feel better, too.”

The easy way to achieve that dual resolution is to call Consolidated Credit at for a free debt analysis. When you pay off those credit cards, your wallet will get fatter – and you’ll get skinnier.